Use a title company if you are not familiar with deeds, deed conveyance and closing of real estate. I prefer First American Title and you can find them anywhere. They will handle the monies, title search, title policy, deed, recording of the deed and pro-rated taxes, etc. Fees will vary and you can certainly negotiate. Typically the seller pays for the title policy and the buyer pays for half of the escrow fees. You can always charge an extra recording fee to offset these expenses.
It depends on a number of factors, are you trying to find cash buyers for your land, what is your time frame to sell the land, and are you trying to get full market value for the property, and how much work do you want to do to sell it? Depending on your answer to those questions the method by which you decide to list and market the property is going to be different.

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We are an established Real Estate Firm looking to buy Raw Land in your area for short term and long term investment purposes.  We have many highly satisfied clients who were glad to get CASH rather than have the burden or liability of property ownership. Many of these clients had plans for their property when they initially purchased it, but with time and circumstance…these plans changed.


You’re in luck! Danny Buys Houses will buy your land for cash fast. Just contact us at (210) 610-2511. We specialize in house and land buying, and the best part is we close quickly! If you need to sell your land fast, you’ve come to the right people. We are also available to answer any questions you might have about buying and selling land, the process, and what your options are. Don’t hesitate to call us, even if you aren’t looking to sell. We love to help!

This whole subject always fascinates me, because it’s a pretty difficult question to answer. Even most appraisers don’t really know what they’re talking about when it comes to valuing land… a vacant lot’s true value is usually a very elusive number to nail down. You may want to see this blog post for more details on how I look at it: https://retipster.com/valueofland
We have been working with Land Century for almost a year now and have had a great experience! Land Century gets us more leads than any of our other marketing efforts. The people that contact us through their site are real and are interested in the land we are listing. Land Century has been easy to deal with and has always performed with integrity. We look forward to working with Land Century for many years to come!! Thanks Land Century!!

This whole subject always fascinates me, because it’s a pretty difficult question to answer. Even most appraisers don’t really know what they’re talking about when it comes to valuing land… a vacant lot’s true value is usually a very elusive number to nail down. You may want to see this blog post for more details on how I look at it: https://retipster.com/valueofland


We currently own 10 acres of land with a lot of road front footage. A very large nice development is underway adjacent to our property; the developer also recently had some type of auction and sold 92 lots. It has been brought to the attention of my husband and I that no homeowner construction can begin until development access issues are resolved. Presently, they have issues with line of sight entering into and out of the development; the development has a small privately paved 2 lane road entering onto the public highway system. Our property sits high on a small hill, it is large enough to occlude site to the left when pulling onto the highway. Our home also sits on a curve. We also have fencing – similar to what you might call pasture fence – that also occludes a drivers site pulling out as well. The developer has sent a neighbor (also his friend, may even be a partner) – who lives in the only house built in the development – although how they built that with restrictions in play – I do not know… Maybe because it was a single dwelling??? It was there before the current developer purchased it from the previous developer (who built the home in there as a “spec house”. First, this representative showed up saying they would like for us to move our fence and they would pay for us to move it (how kind). We just listened… And told him we like our fence just where it is – we know that even with the fence moved the line of site is still occluded – the hill would have to come down or be graded somewhat for it to work. 92 homes would also generate a lot of traffic. A turn lane was mentioned but no details were given – in fact no plan was presented at all. We think he was just feeling us out. My real question is how much should or could we ask for the property if we agreed to whatever their plan is – of course, we would see the plan proposals and bring in a lawyer. I don’t know how to begin to calculate it! I have considered 92 lots multiplied by something! Maybe 20,000 each? My husband spoke with a member of the NCDOT who was out here doing some surveying – he stated that the DOT really had no interest in the property – I want to take that to mean they would not force access for the developer – but I do not know – my knowledge is very limited on this subject. Bottom line is they are in “a real pickle” if we decide not to accommodate/sell them the needed frontage. No money has been offered – it was just stated that we would be compensated. It seems we are in the position of power as far as a selling price – as they cannot develop without meeting those requirements. What would/do you advise and what resources should I use to educate myself. I have found the Policy on Street and Driveway Access to North Carolina Highways and been reading over it. I really do not want us taken advantage of either as far as the construction phase and the end result to our remaining front yard.

Showing: Once a prospective buyer becomes interested in your property, they need a way to see it. Land professionals can do that in several different ways: by walking over it, using an ATV or UTV, or by SUV or truck. A potential buyer must see the property and all of its key features to truly decide if they want to purchase it or not. I find 90% of the time, if a property is well-priced that its location and features are generally what convinces the buyer to make the purchase. But to become convinced they must see it, all of it. Last week a residential agent asked to show one of my tracts that is nearly 300 acres. I told the agent I would be happy to show the property and that you have to be equipped to show the property. They asked, ”Do you mean, I would need a big truck?” This agent drives a Toyota Camry, and there are water bars on the property bigger than this car. You do not want to hire an agent that is unwilling or unequipped to effectively show your property.

Hi, I found your blog via searching for help for a decision. I have two 10 Acre parcels with views of the Stanislaus Mountains in Northern California that are part of an 8 parcel development back in 2006 for $160k each (ouch) with the intention of building a home on one and the other as an investment. One has a well the other does not. There were two owners of the development that built right before the financial crises but no one has built since. I wanted to lower the property tax so I listed them each for $60k, not thinking I’d ever get an offer and since dirt is not selling in that area well, but low and behold within two weeks I received two offers on the parcel with the water well (one from a real estate agent/2nd from a neighbor behind the property). I’m not sure but I think both have different intentions for purchasing which doesn’t matter (you are able to grow marijuana in that county). Now I’m uncertain about selling since it was not my intention and I’d really like to recover my investment. Should I wait to see if land values rise to what I paid back then or should I take the money and run!? They both asked for owner financing. There is access to power and the development’s access is through a gated community. Any comments would be welcomed and appreciated. Thank you!

You’re in luck! Danny Buys Houses will buy your land for cash fast. Just contact us at (210) 610-2511. We specialize in house and land buying, and the best part is we close quickly! If you need to sell your land fast, you’ve come to the right people. We are also available to answer any questions you might have about buying and selling land, the process, and what your options are. Don’t hesitate to call us, even if you aren’t looking to sell. We love to help!
If you are a potential buyer looking to purchase property directly from a seller - Many properties are available across the country and outside of the U.S. including vacant residential lots, large acreages, homes and ranches, hunting and fishing properties, investment properties, land ready for development, commercial buildings and much more. View Listings.
Side Note: While it's easy to assume that your property listings only belong on websites where tons of people are already there, I think it's also important not to overlook the value of having your listings in front of many different audiences. Even when an advertising outlet is less-recognized or newer to the market, it could still be worth your while to post your property information there.
I am currently listing a 10 acre piece of vacant land, which is zoned R-1, in Hesperia, California. The seller states the property can be zoned commercial. I spoke to the planning department and they stated it is zoned residential. My client is totally convinced they are wrong and it can be switched if someone pitches a commercial rezoning presentation. What is your take on this?
Thanks for sharing great information about selling land online. I also have acreage of land for sale. I didn't want to spend money on hiring a real estate agent. But I was confused how can I sell my land without the help of an agent. After reading your blog, now I'm confident that I can sell my land easily. Once again thanks for sharing your thoughts.
I requested a quote 13 days ago & I accept the fact that you are back logged & it could take up to 14 days to get a written response. I just hope that you seriously consider our property for purchase. It really is a great lot. We had plans 13yrs ago to build a house with a walkout basement & even add a pole barn to the property. Times change, situations change & we've been trying to sell this since 2008. I'll keep my fingers crossed & hope that I hear a response with an offer very soon. I appreciate that you look at every property & realize it might take a little longer than 2 weeks to hear something. Thank you very much for your consideration. Amy
LANDFLIP is doing a superb job for my clients. I am a land broker in Alabama and I have been very impressed with the response I have gotten from advertising with LANDFLIP. The format of the property display is concise and informative...just what customers are looking for. I make sure all of my clients properties are displayed on LANDFLIP. A great product from great people.
You’ll want as much money as you can make as quickly as you can get it – but developers play a longer and broader game.  Land you sell may become one small part of their land bank in your locality and, if you’ve signed the wrong deal, you may find they never get planning permission for your land because they choose to promote one of their other local sites which looks an easier consent to win.
First, find experienced professional advisers. Arranging the deal yourself to avoid fees is almost certainly a false economy. An experienced agent, a solicitor and importantly, an accountant, are all essential before any sale negotiations are begun. Developers will have strict criteria for the land they wish to purchase in order to maximise their own profits, so obtaining the correct advice at the start will help ensure you can offer land for sale in the most appealing way to the developer and lucrative way for yourself.
I’m learning the hard way about the hidden costs of buying empty land. Unless utilities are already there, it can be VERY expensive to run them from the street to the building site. For example, one parcel we looked at was about 1000′ feet off the main road where utilities are located. To run city water, gas, electricity, and cable could run anywhere from $10-100 per foot! Multiply that by 1000 and I better understand why developers say that they spend the same on running utilities as they do on the land. It may cause us to reevaluate our goals and possibly shift to buying a property that already has a rundown home on it.

I am considering buying a quarter acre, to build a house for my retirement in a few years. I have never bought land before but it is in an area that will definitely increase in value over the next few years so I want to lock it down now and build the house I want later, rather than purchase a home and make payments in addition to my current home. Thanks for the tips on how to assess, my question is whether I should use a realtor and/or get a property appraisal. I will probably pay cash for the land. Thanks much!
A major issue that we see when people try to sell property to their friends is that they’ll cut breaks for their friends. Perhaps their friend doesn’t have the money, so they’ll allow for later payment while transferring the property to their friend. Always ensure that you are engaging in a business deal that is within your best interests. If your friend does not have the money to buy the land, have a contract written up with payment details and guidelines. Never trust someone blindly - this is a business deal and should be treated as one despite your friendship.
Hi Marie – I think it depends almost entirely on how much you paid when you bought it, and how much you can sell it for (with or without any improvements on it). Improvements will often improve a property’s value, but not always. You need to understand what the highest and best use of the property is and THEN you’ll be able to zero in on what the property may be able to sell for based on how it will be used.
You also need to confirm that each of your planned lots will be properly serviced. Most homeowners expect to face a public road (with adequate frontage) and have water, sewer, power and other utilities available. So be sure to confirm both that typical utilities are available for your lots and that they will have the capacity to handle the load from any new homes that would be built on the subdivided lots. Do your research and have your surveyor locate water, sewer, gas, electricity and other utility lines and infrastructure on your plan.
This all boils down to how badly the developer needs your home, how much money he stands to gain by moving quickly and how robust the multi-unit housing market is. If the final offer falls a bit short of where you’d like it to be, factor in the negatives of staying: more construction noise, additional traffic and all the dough you’ll have to fork out to comfortably remain there. Realize, too, that condo prices, in particular, can be mercurial and turn on a dime if the greater housing market starts going south, which might give your buyer cold feet.
The hard part, however, is getting your neighbours on board if that’s what you’d like to do. Offering a developer a larger parcel of land can be more profitable for them, and therefore more lucrative for you. This will require negotiations and time, possibly between yourself and your neighbours or between your agent and the neighbours. Be prepared that not everyone else will want to sell, even if there’s a big payout promised. Make sure that the extra effort will be worth the final sales result by comparing an estimated selling price for your home with what your portion of the sale will be if you sell to a developer.
A really rough guideline that alot of spot-lot developers use is that the land should be somewhere between 10 and 15% of the sales price of the home. So, if the homes on ten acres were selling for $1 million, the developers were likely paying $100-150k for the lots. The home on your lot would likely sell for substantially less given the smaller lot size, so expect less for the land sale.
Hi Marie – I think it depends almost entirely on how much you paid when you bought it, and how much you can sell it for (with or without any improvements on it). Improvements will often improve a property’s value, but not always. You need to understand what the highest and best use of the property is and THEN you’ll be able to zero in on what the property may be able to sell for based on how it will be used.
These can include a requirement that you dedicate part of “your” land that is in the road right-of-way to the local government, causing you now to be working with a smaller parcel. Other rules may require you to build or improve roads, sidewalks, curb and gutter and even to plant trees. In addition, you also may be required to install water and sewer connections and meters for the lots, or to pay capacity fees, impact fees and other assessments when adding the new homesites.
Once you provide us with a few basic pieces of information, using our simple and easy to use Sell My Land Form, we will automatically receive a copy of that information and begin our review process. Using a mixture of county assessment information, recent local sales data, and research on comparable land properties in the area, we will determine what we’d be able to offer you for your land.
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