We currently own 10 acres of land with a lot of road front footage. A very large nice development is underway adjacent to our property; the developer also recently had some type of auction and sold 92 lots. It has been brought to the attention of my husband and I that no homeowner construction can begin until development access issues are resolved. Presently, they have issues with line of sight entering into and out of the development; the development has a small privately paved 2 lane road entering onto the public highway system. Our property sits high on a small hill, it is large enough to occlude site to the left when pulling onto the highway. Our home also sits on a curve. We also have fencing – similar to what you might call pasture fence – that also occludes a drivers site pulling out as well. The developer has sent a neighbor (also his friend, may even be a partner) – who lives in the only house built in the development – although how they built that with restrictions in play – I do not know… Maybe because it was a single dwelling??? It was there before the current developer purchased it from the previous developer (who built the home in there as a “spec house”. First, this representative showed up saying they would like for us to move our fence and they would pay for us to move it (how kind). We just listened… And told him we like our fence just where it is – we know that even with the fence moved the line of site is still occluded – the hill would have to come down or be graded somewhat for it to work. 92 homes would also generate a lot of traffic. A turn lane was mentioned but no details were given – in fact no plan was presented at all. We think he was just feeling us out. My real question is how much should or could we ask for the property if we agreed to whatever their plan is – of course, we would see the plan proposals and bring in a lawyer. I don’t know how to begin to calculate it! I have considered 92 lots multiplied by something! Maybe 20,000 each? My husband spoke with a member of the NCDOT who was out here doing some surveying – he stated that the DOT really had no interest in the property – I want to take that to mean they would not force access for the developer – but I do not know – my knowledge is very limited on this subject. Bottom line is they are in “a real pickle” if we decide not to accommodate/sell them the needed frontage. No money has been offered – it was just stated that we would be compensated. It seems we are in the position of power as far as a selling price – as they cannot develop without meeting those requirements. What would/do you advise and what resources should I use to educate myself. I have found the Policy on Street and Driveway Access to North Carolina Highways and been reading over it. I really do not want us taken advantage of either as far as the construction phase and the end result to our remaining front yard.
Side Note: While it's easy to assume that your property listings only belong on websites where tons of people are already there, I think it's also important not to overlook the value of having your listings in front of many different audiences. Even when an advertising outlet is less-recognized or newer to the market, it could still be worth your while to post your property information there.
Technorati Tags: Couple Of Minutes, Investment Purposes, land buyers, land buyers california, land buyers colorado, land buyers florida, land buyers new mexico, land buyers north carolina, land buyers texas, land buying, land buying arizona, land selling, Long Term Investment, Lot, lot sales, Money, Nbsp, Property Information, Property Ownership, Raw Land, raw land buyers, Real Estate Firm, Realtors, sell land, sell my land, sell my land for cash, sell my lot, sell my vacant land, Submit Online, Time And Circumstance, Unwanted Land, vacant land buyers, who buys land, who buys lots
We hope this helps provide valuable insight for landowners about the pros, cons and items to evaluate when considering subdividing your land. Check back soon for our second article in this series about Subdividing Land: Tips for Landowners from a Developer, where we will describe some real world issues that we have seen in subdivision attempts. Plus, the third article in the series will provide hands-on details about the steps to take if you decide to subdivide your land into lots.
In addition, landowners may more readily find buyers for smaller subdivided parcels that are more affordable than one larger piece of land. Try to understand the market’s needs. Completing the lot subdivision up front saves the purchaser the time, effort and risk of doing it themselves, increasing the salability – and often the value – of the overall property.
You can also look to certain companies and organizations that have a concentration of people that may fall in the above mentioned roles such as investment companies (i.e. Charles Schwab, Fidelity), financial advising companies (i.e. Morgan Stanley, Merrill Lynch). There may be a higher concentration of people who can both afford and want to build their own custom homes or to build income-producing properties. Try linking yourself to financial advisors who may already know of people who have these types of dreams. This isn't a comprehensive answer of all the possibilities but just some thoughts. Good luck!
Hi Prakash, the best way out to sell your property is to advertise your property through different media including online property portals like 99acres.com since online media is faster and quicker. You can also go for offline media options like magazines and newspaper in which you can easily give your advertisements in the classified sections and specific real estate supplements. Apart from this, you may also purchase a paid package service provided by various online portals in which they will charge you on a monthly basis and in return they will give prominence to your ad over non-paid ads. For paid package services, you may refer to 99acres.com and choose option buy our services: http://www.99acres.com/do/buyourservices
First and foremost, it is vitally important to understand what a property can be used for, and what the highest and best use of the property is. With a simple phone call to your local planning  & zoning department, most offices can give you the answer to this question in a matter of seconds. Once you know the zoning classification (e.g. – residential, mixed-use, commercial, industrial, agricultural, etc.), ask them to give you some examples of what type of property would be allowed under each of these particular zoning classifications. They may even give you some ideas that you hadn't previously thought of. Once you understand the most ideal use of the property – you can quickly determine whether it will fit your needs (or the needs of those you intend to market the property to).
I like the suggestion to send out neighbor letters to the surrounding property owners. That is a great way to get the word out that you are selling your land. When I went to sell my land, I made sure to tell my neighbors or post of social media and every other platform in order to allow more people to see that my lot was for sale. I ended up way over my original price and with a good buyer that built his family a home there.
I just ran across this post from over a year ago. Great general info! There are also local websites, specific to certain cities or regions that will advertise your property for free. In my current area of Utah, the best site is KSL.com, associated with a local newspaper. When I advertised in Southern California, Craigslist was the best free site. In some areas, nothing beats a small flyer on a physical bulletin board at the local convenient store. The best advice in this article is the CONTENT and the PHOTOS. Nobody will find your property without the right search terms, including proximity to local landmarks and features by name! - Don't just say "near lake." Put "easy walk to Fish Lake." Once a potential buyer finds your ad, the photos can reel them in. A photo of dirt and a few trees is nice but perhaps you can include a pic of you in a hammock between 2 trees or by a campfire or fishing in the nearby stream. Buying land is often much more about emotion than a list of cost vs. benefits. If it is a rural building lot, show photos of nice, nearby cabins or homes that help a buyer visualize the potential. Also remember to list other components that might make your deal stand out like owner financing or lease with option to purchase.
If you want to get the inside scoop on how to start and run you own land investing business, come and check out the REtipster Club – where you'll get access to a full 12-week course, videos, bonuses, downloads and a members-only forum (where I spend time answering questions every week). There is no better place to learn this business from the inside out.
The hard part, however, is getting your neighbours on board if that’s what you’d like to do. Offering a developer a larger parcel of land can be more profitable for them, and therefore more lucrative for you. This will require negotiations and time, possibly between yourself and your neighbours or between your agent and the neighbours. Be prepared that not everyone else will want to sell, even if there’s a big payout promised. Make sure that the extra effort will be worth the final sales result by comparing an estimated selling price for your home with what your portion of the sale will be if you sell to a developer.

Hi Chris, thanks for the comment. That’s a pretty subjective question (there are a lot of variables to consider), but I don’t see how it could hurt the value of your overall estate. The question is – what is the land actually worth? Is it worth more or less than $25K? One way to find out would be to follow the ideas in this blog post. As long as the property is worth substantially more than $25K (and assuming you actually want the additional land), it’s probably a worthwhile investment… but again – it’s impossible for me to tell you anything concrete without looking at everything (which I can’t really do).
By submitting the information in this form, I give my consent for Landmark Properties, LLC d/b/a Landmark Property Buyers to share this information with its network of affiliate real estate investors. Furthermore, I give my consent for members of this affiliate network to contact me about purchasing the above-mentioned property. I also acknowledge that there is no obligation on the part of Landmark Property Buyers or any member of its affiliate network to extend an offer to purchase my property. By submitting this form I am granting Landmark Property Buyers and its affiliate network my full permission to review the information contained in this form and to contact me about the possibility of purchasing this property. I also agree that Landmark Property Buyers will not be held liable for the actions of the members of its affiliate network. These actions include but are not limited to, sharing my information with third parties and unsolicited attempts to communicate with me. I also confirm that the information contained in the form is correct to the best of my knowledge.
Planning Consent. This will be needed before development is begun, but who obtains it is a question for landowners. Embarking on the planning process at your own risk can pay off, but it is a gamble and we recommend that you speak to either a surveyor, a planning consultant or a planning officer at your local authority to get an idea as to whether or not an application for consent for development would be successful. Many such applications will go to appeal. Is the planning consent you obtain going to be the one developers need? This is why many landowners enter into promotion agreements or conditional contracts which oblige others to apply for planning, as they often have a greater chance of success on the right terms. Be aware though, that extensive price negotiations can take place once planning consent is obtained, and the actual net development area can be calculated. This will take into account any ‘extra’ costs such as wildlife surveys or ground investigations that are required as a result of the planning conditions.

Advice: One of the added benefits of hiring this agent is that they can advise you on much more than just the price of your land. A true professional will have a network of individuals that can help you with anything from tax planning to pond building. An experienced agent can tell you what is possible. They may know many things that can save or make you money during your transaction. Most of the time a good agent will help you net more money from selling your property than you can get on your own.


If you're a rental property owner, I can't think of any good reason not to use this site, especially considering the software is free for the landlord (any fees are covered by the applicants and tenants). It's definitely not the right fit for every real estate professional since it's only intended for landlords and tenants, but if you fit that profile, you owe it to yourself to check this site out.
Other options to consider are selling your land with owner financing which makes it easier for people to afford. Trying to find cash buyers can be difficult depending on your asking price and banks don't typically want to lend on vacant land. Also, if you have land you want to sell in a hurry and you'd like to get cash for it there are a number of wholesale land buyers that make be interested in making you a cash offer for your land.

BIG TIME CLASSIFIEDS at http://www.BigTimeClassifieds.com is a great new two year old free classifieds site offering free ads, unlimited text, hyperlinks clickable directly to your site and even video to bring your ads to life. Categories for Real Estate, Boats for Sale, Electronics, Services, Products, and pretty much everything. New User Accounts are OK’ed usually within a couple of hours. Just don’t over post the same item or service or they remove your account for life. Excellent SEO at this site for your ads – be sure to enter keywords.

Just like you'd stage a home, you want the vacant land to show at its best. A lot overgrown with weeds is going to look less desirable in the eyes of a potential buyer than a lot that's apparently cared-for. Professionally trim trees, mow grass, remove weeds and perhaps plant wildflowers to show the property at its best. Visit the property weekly – or hire someone to do so – to remove windblown trash, beer cans, fire rings or anything else that might detract from its curb appeal.

Get your title sorted. This may seem obvious, but title issues will deter developers and delay sales. Unregistered land, missing documents, restrictive covenants, boundary problems, lack of easements, or rights of access or rights of way- these can all be resolved but it is better to address the issue early and ensure the title is good and marketable. Does your land have direct access to the adopted highway? This is one of the key things developers look for.
Market for Land is Less Active – The market for existing homes is almost always more vibrant than the land market. There simply are fewer numbers of buyers for vacant land than consumers looking for homes. Start marketing a new home listing and a new lot listing when both are desirable and priced well, and you generally can expect fewer contacts about the new lot listing.
×