Grace Chang is amazing. I had to sell a land contract and was very concerned that our buyer would be happy with the new arrangements. Grace's helpful and caring attitude made all the difference. She walked me through every stage of this difficult process and everything turned out perfect. She was very professional, knowledgeable, and focused on the task to be done. Thank you Grace!read more
You will need to advertise an email address and phone number for people to contact you so you can field additional questions about the property. Most often, people will want to know if the property is free and clear of any liens or encumbrances including back taxes. They will want to know if there are any other closing costs, Home Owner Association Fees and other details regarding the property. Always be direct when dealing with your customers. If you don't know the answer simply say you don't know and that you'll find out or direct them to the appropriate resource. Typically a surveyor or the local county can help them with what they are looking for.

I’m so happy that you mentioned to send out letters to your neighbors that say you are planning on selling your place. My sister had the worse time trying to sell her place. She put ads online and in the newspaper, talked to real estate agents, and tried other methods. It wasn’t until she sent letters out to her neighbors that she got a response. All in all, don’t give up! You’ll find someone to buy your place one way or another!
If you find items during your review that may be problematic, you and your attorney should evaluate them carefully to find a solution, or see if you are able to get title insurance that provides specific coverage to protect you and ultimately your buyers. But never ignore a tricky restriction or convince yourself that it won’t be a problem. Beware, even the pros can get into trouble if they become too wedded to their grand plans. You may get away with bypassing restrictions for a while, but doing so can cost you down the road – especially when trying to sell or finance the property. We’ll describe more of these real-world risks in the second article.
A major issue that we see when people try to sell property to their friends is that they’ll cut breaks for their friends. Perhaps their friend doesn’t have the money, so they’ll allow for later payment while transferring the property to their friend. Always ensure that you are engaging in a business deal that is within your best interests. If your friend does not have the money to buy the land, have a contract written up with payment details and guidelines. Never trust someone blindly - this is a business deal and should be treated as one despite your friendship.
In addition, landowners may more readily find buyers for smaller subdivided parcels that are more affordable than one larger piece of land. Try to understand the market’s needs. Completing the lot subdivision up front saves the purchaser the time, effort and risk of doing it themselves, increasing the salability – and often the value – of the overall property.
Be sure to use visual tools to tell the story of your lot or land in your online listing in a beautiful and compelling way. You can’t show photos of a kitchen or great room, so be creative with your lot or land photographs. Use attractive photos of the home site, natural features of the land, the view from your property and even community amenities (see tips for creating great photos for lot and land listings). Use maps and surveys to show the property boundaries and where it is located. Learn more in our related article about 5 tips for selling lots or land with online listings.

One of the most important first steps before subdividing your land or land you wish to buy is to make sure there are no restrictions that will block your plans. Everything from ordinances, neighborhood covenants to deed restrictions may prohibit – or fatally complicate – your plans. Review these items carefully, plus order a professional title review (typically through a real estate attorney) so that you can understand whether there are any deal killing issues that apply to the property and prevent subdividing.
If an application is turned down, it is usually because access to the site is difficult or it adjoins a main road. The ideal building site has frontage on an existing road. As little as 30 ft to the side of your house can provide enough land for a new house, although permission is more likely to be given on tight plots if existing houses in the street are closely packed.
I’m impressed with the amount of effort that went into putting this article together! And I can also say that these tips are all great. People don’t understand the power of the internet, and how many free resources there are out there when it comes to selling your house. I’m glad you put this together, this is some really valuable information! I buy houses in south texas and I will be sure to share this article on my social sites! I’m always looking for valuable content to share. Thanks!
Now I was reading about the 1450 sq ft build. A baby house maybe. I’d be more inclined toward a squad tent, (i have one 16X32 with a woodstove and 5000 kw generator and string of lights for sale. $3500.00 plus shipping and handling.), or a plains INDIAN Teepee which I also have for $2500.00 plus shipping and handling. Real Buffalo Robes, very soft and heavy, for $3500.00 a piece plus shipping and handling.

Hotpads is a unique one on this list, because it's only intended for listing properties (houses, apartments, condos, etc) for rent, not for sale. Nevertheless, this still fills a major need for many property owners, and since it's one of the bigger players in the space, with a very well-designed layout and interface, it's definitely worth mentioning on this list.
If you are dealing with a single lot being subdivided into two or three residential lots, you may be able to handle this by working with a few real estate professionals that will help you in the process. Be thorough during your due diligence and planning so you can evaluate whether subdividing is feasible and makes financial sense. (More on this in a minute.)
Your buyer profile can depend on what type of property you are selling, whether the land has been developed already, its location and market conditions, among other criteria.  Is your likely buyer an individual looking for a lot for a new home? Or is your buyer going to be a builder or developer looking for land for their next project?  Or is your buyer some combination of those, or someone different altogether? There may be different buyers for finished lots, rural acreage or a parcel of suburban land in a thriving new home market.
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