Bankrate’s content, including the guidance of its advice-and-expert columns and this website, is intended only to assist you with financial decisions. The content is broad in scope and does not consider your personal financial situation. Bankrate recommends that you seek the advice of advisers who are fully aware of your individual circumstances before making any final decisions or implementing any financial strategy. Please remember that your use of this website is governed by Bankrate’s Terms of Use.

Side Note: While it's easy to assume that your property listings only belong on websites where tons of people are already there, I think it's also important not to overlook the value of having your listings in front of many different audiences. Even when an advertising outlet is less-recognized or newer to the market, it could still be worth your while to post your property information there.

To a shrewd investor, any asset of value is for sale, for the right price. Undeveloped land, also known as raw land, represents a real estate investment that is different from more traditional house and land deals. While undeveloped land sells for less than land that is ready to build on, or already includes viable structures, it can still turn a profit if you put care and thought into the sale process.


If this process overwhelms you, consider hiring a land broker. A land broker will take a commission but they will handle all of the above for you. Hopefully they will price the property so that you make almost as much as you would have without hiring the land broker meanwhile it saves you a lot of time and hassle. I do not recommend working with a land broker who charges a flat upfront fee even if the property doesn't sell as there is no built-in incentive for them to sell the property. Keep on top of them and make sure they are doing their job. Unless the commission is hefty, a land broker isn't going to care as much about selling your land and may end up just listing it on their own website and letting it sit there forever. Communicate regularly with your land broker so your listing remains a priority for them even if it's just to get you off their back!
Great list of ways to reach potential buyers Seth! If someone does ALL those, they’re very likely to get their house sold. We Buy Houses investors can be a great way to sell your house fast if you are short on time or don’t want to mess with the hassle. Otherwise offering the seller financing option can be a game changer and even more profitable for sellers. If you’re in a position to offer that, be sure to vet your buyer for their ability to make good on the payments. Thank you!
Disclaimer: The information published in this section is of a general nature only and does not consider your personal objectives, financial situation or particular needs. Where indicated, third parties have written and supplied the content and we are not responsible for it. We make no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or reliability of the information, nor do we accept any liability or responsibility arising in any way from omissions or errors contained in the content. We do not recommend sponsored lenders or loan products and we cannot introduce you to sponsored lenders. We strongly recommend that you obtain independent advice before you act on the content.
Hey Seth, as always great article! I found the free online marketing ideas (like posting on Craigslist) especially creative and helpful. Thanks so much for helping me through the stressful process of selling my home. Since you asked what other creative tips I’ve found–I read this eBook in my research and found it so helpful that I thought I’d post it here in the chance that it could help someone else. Here it is: https://www.homelight.com/sell-your-house-online-ebook
Very informative articles, and exchanges. I have a general question about subdivisions. I am looking to sell a 5 acre parcel, that would accommodate about 45 lots. The lots would be sold, with houses built, for a minimum of $750,000 each. Would you say there a rough guide, as to what percentage the cost of land should be for each lot sold? Obviously, the lower the cost of the acquired land, the better for the developer, but I’m just wondering if there is a ‘rule of thumb’ in the business. For example, no more than 25% of a lot’s sale price should go towards the cost of the land? I am not looking to push the buyer to their break-even point, but I want to get a fair price too.

Your buyer profile can depend on what type of property you are selling, whether the land has been developed already, its location and market conditions, among other criteria.  Is your likely buyer an individual looking for a lot for a new home? Or is your buyer going to be a builder or developer looking for land for their next project?  Or is your buyer some combination of those, or someone different altogether? There may be different buyers for finished lots, rural acreage or a parcel of suburban land in a thriving new home market.
×