Settle on a price that is acceptable to both parties. But don’t exceed the price you initially set as your maximum amount to pay. No property is worth paying more than you can afford. "Decide what a transaction is worth to you. A property may be worth more in value to you than the actual appraisal. Take the emotion out of it and deal with it in terms of dollars and sense," confers King. And, "don't be afraid to walk away from a deal, just do so with a handshake and a smile and do not burn that bridge."

Hi Dave, thanks for stopping by. You’re right – it’s very hard for me to give you any concrete opinion on this (because there are a lot of factors to weigh with any piece of vacant land). I’d say if you’ve looked at all the potential downsides and established that there won’t be any issues from that end… and if you’ve got a fairly decent idea as to what the property is currently worth (and you’re buying it for a price that is significantly BELOW that number), then sure – there probably is a fair chance that you can make money on it.
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FindMyRoof does a pretty decent job of putting together a nice listing that gives all the basic details in an easy-to-follow format. It's not a terribly complex process to create a listing, and the site doesn't draw in a huge amount of traffic – but it is a relatively targeted audience of real estate buyers, which may make the site worth your time and consideration.
We found a really great 2 acre property zoned rural residential in the area of town that we really want to live in Oregon. It is the only lot left in the older established subdivision, so it has city water but would need a septic (which everyone in the neighborhood has of course). One big issue is that it is basically a forest. The whole lot is full of trees, huge and small.

I would like to thank Mallory Herrera for the great job she did when she bought our note.She was always courteous no matter how many questions i had for her,and never felt any pressure from her to sell.She kept her word on the price she quoted from the beginning.Always answered her phone when i called no matter what time of day.She gets five stars from me and if i could give her more she will get them to.Good luck for the future.read more
Selling lots and land has its unique challenges and strategies when compared to selling a home, and these are several of the ways you can boost your selling efforts. Whether you’re just starting the process of selling your lot or land or you need to re-energize your efforts, we hope these tips help you. So take action and find a way to reach past the home buyers and get to that pool of active lot and land buyers.
If your property and those around it have recently been rezoned, this could be a sign you can sell your property to a developer for a good profit. But nothing is set in stone. The next best step is to speak to your real estate agent, who will know what has recently sold and whether any developers are actively looking in your area. They can then assess your home to see whether it would be able to sell and some estimated figures.
I’m sure it could be done. I actually live in a subdivision that started exactly like how you’re describing back in the 70’s. I think it can be a pretty big speculative gamble unless you’re absolutely certain that there’s a huge demand for what you’re creating… but if you end up being right, you could easily make millions (depending on how big of a project you’re looking at).

FindMyRoof does a pretty decent job of putting together a nice listing that gives all the basic details in an easy-to-follow format. It's not a terribly complex process to create a listing, and the site doesn't draw in a huge amount of traffic – but it is a relatively targeted audience of real estate buyers, which may make the site worth your time and consideration.
If either of these things are inhibited, it wouldn’t be highly unlikely that the land can be secured in the way you describe. In a free market, the seller can (and usually will) sell to whoever is offering the best deal at the right time – so if the developer can’t be competitive in this way, it boils down to the old saying, “Beggars can’t be choosers”.
Hi David, I think it has everything to do with the zoning of the property, and what the local municipality will allow you to do with it (given the size, shape, location, and what exactly you’re hoping to do with it). Once you have a specific property in mind, you could find out pretty easily by calling the local planning & zoning department. Just ask them what can be done with the property, and they should be able to give you your answer!
After identifying your likely buyers, try to think like them so you can focus your message to convey what they need to know about your property. Have information ready about schools, shopping and other nearby amenities. For developable land you can be prepared with zoning information and insight from local authorities about the location and capacity of water and sewer service. Each property is different, so customize your information for your situation and your targeted buyers.
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