Another surprise to landowners attempting to subdivide their land is that the act of subdividing can raise any number of additional requirements and costs on your land. While your existing parcel may have been grandfathered so that it does not have to comply with some newer laws and regulations, undertaking a subdivision can trigger a new set of impacts and requirements.

I am a relatively new real estate agent and just got a land listing. This is a great article with many helpful strategies for selling land. I think selling land can be a bit intimidating because most sellers have such high expectations that you will sell their land for them quickly and it usually takes much longer, as you pointed out in your article. Thank you for the great information!
All properties are sold for cash or hard money. Buyers responsibility to do your own due diligence and verify all information. Prices are NET to seller with buyer paying all closing costs. Opinions of value / rents are given as a courtesy and no guarantees are expressed or implied. Our properties move fast so contact us quickly if there is a property you want to purchase.
This website gives sellers the option of listing their properties on the MLS for a flat fee (without signing a contract with a real estate agent). Granted – this extra feature isn't free, but it's a nice little premium tool that isn't offered by most of the other platforms on this list – and considering what a HUGE additional audience the MLS represents, I thought it was worth pointing this out.

Know what the land is zoned for. From the beginning, you need to have a clear understanding of what this land is zoned for. You don’t want to discourage buyers by keeping them waiting until you have the answer, and you definitely don’t want to mislead a buyer with incorrect information. It’s better to be honest and then refer the buyer to information about changing land classifications and zoning exemptions.


This website gives sellers the option of listing their properties on the MLS for a flat fee (without signing a contract with a real estate agent). Granted – this extra feature isn't free, but it's a nice little premium tool that isn't offered by most of the other platforms on this list – and considering what a HUGE additional audience the MLS represents, I thought it was worth pointing this out.
Double check ad data for any property you’re considering; they’re often full of mistakes – not necessarily misleading information, but it comes from laziness. What doesn’t help is that when a listing first gets posted, apparently nearly all real estate websites post it as their own without checking it for accuracy. For example, we’re considering a property that has multiple issues:

Advice: One of the added benefits of hiring this agent is that they can advise you on much more than just the price of your land. A true professional will have a network of individuals that can help you with anything from tax planning to pond building. An experienced agent can tell you what is possible. They may know many things that can save or make you money during your transaction. Most of the time a good agent will help you net more money from selling your property than you can get on your own.
Buyers of undeveloped land will have fewer and less attractive financing options through banks than other real estate buyers will. Banks ask for large down payments on undeveloped land and don't offer interest rates as low as those available for new homes. As a result, finding a buyer for your land will be more difficult. If you can afford to offer your own financing, you will open the door to a larger pool of prospective buyers. Hire a lawyer or real estate agent with experience in seller-financed deals to lay out the terms for this type of sale.
I’m not the best person to answer that, because I’m not a lawyer and I know very little about what your rights are – but I imagine it could be difficult to prove much without a signed contract. That being said, I’ve heard that there are potential claims on the grounds of “squatters rights“. If you’ve lived at the property for 20 years, there may be something worth exploring here.
I have an opportunity to buy 53 acres of recreational land. 9 of the acres is a pond and another 16 acres is CRP land. I was thinking about sub dividing these lots for a private campground. I currently own a single lot in a private campground about 70 acres and most lots are .18 ac that sells for $4000 each. I am looking to do the same as the owner did years ago, but with possibly my own piece of land. Without tipping off the owner on this opportunity, land for sale, what problems may I encounter, or unforseen costs will I run into?
You will need to advertise an email address and phone number for people to contact you so you can field additional questions about the property. Most often, people will want to know if the property is free and clear of any liens or encumbrances including back taxes. They will want to know if there are any other closing costs, Home Owner Association Fees and other details regarding the property. Always be direct when dealing with your customers. If you don't know the answer simply say you don't know and that you'll find out or direct them to the appropriate resource. Typically a surveyor or the local county can help them with what they are looking for.
"I've seen both buyers and sellers do this to try and gain some type of advantage in negotiations," says Robert King, a land agent with AlaLandCo; a native of Clay County, Alabama, he has over 10 years experience in marketing and selling property. "It rarely, if ever, works, and absolutely serves to drive the parties further apart." Also, don’t make a laundry list of everything that is wrong with a property you are trying to buy, cautions King. "You must like the property, or you would not have spent all that time figuring out everything that is wrong with it. That just puts the seller on guard and creates a personal barrier." When you impart your wealth of knowledge of all of the property's shortcomings to the other party, you are not likely to make a friend of the seller, says King. You want to be on friendly not adversarial terms with anyone you are negotiating with for the land deal.

Great article. I’m having trouble finding information, as most of it is about buying and constructing right away. I’m looking for information on how to buy a rural piece of land 2-10 acres where I can camp on it for a couple of seasons to get the best site to build a little summer/fall shack to get away on the weekends. So I won’t be building right away, just ‘squatting’ on my own land for surveying purposes, see where the hottest/sunniest spots might be, etc. Do you have any advice on what regulations/restrictions I might come across? Is this a “depends on” on kind of thing, meaning, different counties/townships all might have different rules? Thanks again.
I like the suggestion to send out neighbor letters to the surrounding property owners. That is a great way to get the word out that you are selling your land. When I went to sell my land, I made sure to tell my neighbors or post of social media and every other platform in order to allow more people to see that my lot was for sale. I ended up way over my original price and with a good buyer that built his family a home there.
First impressions are lasting in real estate. When selling a home you would never leave out your dirty laundry for potential buyers to see, and you should also clean up your lot before it is shown and marketed.  Cut the grass (or weeds), remove trash and take marketing photos of your property when it is looking its best. Some sellers even plant wildflowers to make their vacant land look beautiful. It’s like staging a home, but you’re just working with raw land instead.
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