This has got to be one of best articles out there about land investment. Thank you so much for the advises. I live in San Jose, CA and I am also looking into buying land myself to build a residential home on. I’m somewhat skeptical about it as i’m very new to this whole process and afraid i might be stuck on a parcel that is not build-able or would cost too much to develop. The parcel i’m looking at is currently zoned “commercial”, however, the surrounding area is heavily residential so i wonder if this was a city’s mistake. To avoid troubles down the road, I plan to hire a professional for all the permitting and developing advises/estimate (if you know anyone in the Bay Area that provides this type of service, could you please refer?) but I just don’t know how much i can completely close my eyes and just sign wherever i was told by the professional. Any advise will be much appreciated.

To be honest, I actually had a hard time with this site at first. For some reason, it was automatically flag and removing all of my listings almost immediately after posting… which was a little problematic. I'm still not sure why it was doing this – but I'm guessing it was because my listings were all for vacant land, and these properties typically don't have a verifiable street address. That being said, if you can actually get your listings posted successfully – the ads do a good job of highlighting all the important details in a short amount of space.
A Perc Test (also known as “Perk Test”, and more formally known as a “Percolation Test“), is a soil evaluation that tests the rate at which water drains through the soil. If a property doesn't have easy access to the local sewer system, a perc test is required to determine whether a septic system (the alternative to a sewer) can be installed on the property.
Environmental issues. Contaminated land is what springs to mind when environmental issues are mentioned, but in this scenario, what is most likely are potential flooding or drainage problems. A history of flooding or waterlogging is clearly not going to be welcome news for a developer, but equally if the land has been used for potentially contaminative uses in the past or is near to sources of contamination, remember that remedying any actual contamination is costly and will significantly affect the value of the land. Any past surveys or reports that have been carried out should be to hand if required.
I am looking at a property in Spanish Fort, Alabama. The neighborhood development began prior to the 2008 crash and sat for years. A house has started being built on a lot in 2013. A crack formed in the foundation of the house, and a stop work was ordered by the city. At this point my thought was to buy the property, scrap the house (its still sitting in the beginning stages after 3 years) and start over. The property now has made a mess in the neighbors yard for a over two years. 1) can the run off problem be fixed (its a huge mess) 2) how can a person get copies of photos (topography) of the property before the development started by the builders? These copies would have been from around 2006. I heard seeing the natural lay of the land could be very important when deciding if this run off problem is fixable. Thanks you for any help you can offer. I am just fearful of purchasing a huge nightmare that can’t be fixed.
LANDFLIP offers quality exposure for my company's rural real estate listings. It also provides an excellent avenue to search for land for our clients who are looking to buy. LANDFLIP is a great starting point for anyone who is looking to buy or sell land. Due to the national exposure and user-friendly website, I use LANDFLIP to help supplement my marketing campaign.
I am searching for land also. I would like it to have a septic and well. I have been using zillow and landwatch.com. I have tried reaching out to real estate agents for help but they haven’t been very helpful. I was wondering would you be able to share how you find this property with elec, well and septic? Was it posted online or through a real estate agent, etc?
Hi Colt, whenever I buy landlocked parcels, my offer is VERY low (because practically speaking, if nobody can access it, it might as well be on the moon – which isn’t all that useful UNLESS someone can obtain legal access). One way to prove that it’s landlocked would be to find a parcel map of the property – and I explain how to do that in this blog post: https://retipster.com/property-pictures
If, for whatever reason, you don’t want to use Craigslist, another option is Facebook. Mark said, “right now, people are selling all day long on buy/sell groups on Facebook.” However, these are not the typical real estate buy/sell groups. “They’re going to Craigslist buy/sell groups, recreational vehicles buy/sell groups, hunting buy/sell groups, or fishing buy/sell groups.”

Hi David, I think it has everything to do with the zoning of the property, and what the local municipality will allow you to do with it (given the size, shape, location, and what exactly you’re hoping to do with it). Once you have a specific property in mind, you could find out pretty easily by calling the local planning & zoning department. Just ask them what can be done with the property, and they should be able to give you your answer!

Hi Victoria – you’d probably want to check with your local municipality to see who owns these parcels that surround the house (or you could also check out this tutorial or this tutorial to figure it out yourself). You generally don’t want to touch any trees that aren’t on the parcel that you own… but in terms of whether those surrounding parcels are “preserved woodlands” – that’s an answer you could probably get from someone with the local government office. Just Google the township or county clerk, give them a call and see what you can find out.
Planning Consent. This will be needed before development is begun, but who obtains it is a question for landowners. Embarking on the planning process at your own risk can pay off, but it is a gamble and we recommend that you speak to either a surveyor, a planning consultant or a planning officer at your local authority to get an idea as to whether or not an application for consent for development would be successful. Many such applications will go to appeal. Is the planning consent you obtain going to be the one developers need? This is why many landowners enter into promotion agreements or conditional contracts which oblige others to apply for planning, as they often have a greater chance of success on the right terms. Be aware though, that extensive price negotiations can take place once planning consent is obtained, and the actual net development area can be calculated. This will take into account any ‘extra’ costs such as wildlife surveys or ground investigations that are required as a result of the planning conditions.
About 15 years ago the best way to market your rural land was either a classified ad in the local paper, signage off the highway or the local pennysaver. Larger companies would use radio or some other direct marketing technique. All of these marketing strategies were slower and more expensive than the options today. I know we all like to complain about inflation but in terms of online marketing we're in a deflationary environment!

I am a relatively new real estate agent and just got a land listing. This is a great article with many helpful strategies for selling land. I think selling land can be a bit intimidating because most sellers have such high expectations that you will sell their land for them quickly and it usually takes much longer, as you pointed out in your article. Thank you for the great information!
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