Honestly, since you’re the buyer, there’s no real reason not to use a realtor (because they’ll take their money from the seller, not you). I’d just be sure to get one who knows their stuff (i.e. – make sure they have some level of experience dealing with vacant land, as it’s a whole different animal than what most realtors are used to dealing with).

Overall, I like how Oodle makes it pretty quick and simple to compile a listing, and the syndication with Redfin is another huge selling point for the site. Assuming you can get the site to keep your listing active without flagging and removing them (which was unfortunately a big obstacle for me), it's a nice little outlet to get some additional exposure for your listings.


There is swampy/nonbuildable property next to me that is landlocked by 5 residential properties. We are interested in purchasing it – yes, we want landlocked swampland. We spoke to the owner who said he wants to sell it at whatever the going rate is for vacant land. Prior to offering him a very lowball offer, we’d like to gather resources that show the property’s true “potential” so that we don’t offend him. Other than a printout of a map, is there something more official we can acquire that shows he is landlocked? Also, the tax record shows the property’s assessed tax value is 100k, which is definitely inaccurate. Is there a way to have that reassessed to reflect its true tax value? We heard through a neighbor that it is recorded as nonbuildable and he doesn’t have to pay taxes, but I have not been able to find anywhere to verifiy that. Thanks in advance for any advice you can offer!!!
It depends on a number of factors, are you trying to find cash buyers for your land, what is your time frame to sell the land, and are you trying to get full market value for the property, and how much work do you want to do to sell it? Depending on your answer to those questions the method by which you decide to list and market the property is going to be different.
I recently had the opportunity to work with Grace Chang regarding the partial purchase of a note that I brokered to FNAC in 2015. Grace informed me, out of the blue, that FNAC would purchase an additional partial, or the full remaining balance, if my client was interested. I contacted my client and she was very pleased with the offers from FNAC. My client happily opted to sell an additional partial, and, thanks to Grace's knowledge and professionalism, the transaction was completed quickly. Grace Chang is a pleasure to work with!read more
In the right location, today’s seller’s market makes it so you could put your home on the market as-is and likely still receive interest. But if there’s a possibility you’re misdiagnosing your home as a desirable purchase for a teardown, you should think about preparing the home properly for the market, as minor updates and cleaning can go a long way. You could have your property appraised to see how it would likely fare compared to similar homes in your neighborhood, or consult a real estate agent to see if they expect more builder versus homebuyer interest.
When you sell land by yourself, this is called a private sale. So, you will need to find a private buyer. It may help you to talk with local farmers if you are looking to sell raw land; farmers have all kinds of experience in purchasing land for their crops. If you are selling your land on your own without the aid of a real estate agent, this next section is for you.
Comparables for land can be trickier than for home sales in your area. Although the assessor's valuation on your taxes can provide a starting point, consider factors like whether your property has utilities to the property line, views, zoning and any preapproved building plans to determine its worth. Location is always one of the most critical factors. In San Francisco's Pacific Heights area, for example, a buildable cul-de-sac lot of less than 4,000 square feet can sell for more than $9 million.
I am considering buying a quarter acre, to build a house for my retirement in a few years. I have never bought land before but it is in an area that will definitely increase in value over the next few years so I want to lock it down now and build the house I want later, rather than purchase a home and make payments in addition to my current home. Thanks for the tips on how to assess, my question is whether I should use a realtor and/or get a property appraisal. I will probably pay cash for the land. Thanks much!
Hi Aracely – great question. You might want to contact the local planning and zoning department – ask them if you’re allowed to camp on the property and/or build whatever type of structure you’re planning to build. You’re right – most townships and cities (not the county necessarily) have different restrictions that come into play in different areas. You’ll probably find that the more rural areas have less and less restrictions, but generally speaking – you should always investigate, because some rules will most likely apply.

If you want to get the inside scoop on how to start and run you own land investing business, come and check out the REtipster Club – where you'll get access to a full 12-week course, videos, bonuses, downloads and a members-only forum (where I spend time answering questions every week). There is no better place to learn this business from the inside out.
As you are aware, we have worked worked with Land Century since its start back in 2006. I wanted to thank you for all your professionalism, the quick follow up, the integrity with how you operate and for helping us buy and sell hundreds of properties across the USA. As you know, about two years ago we directed all our lots sales and purchases exclusively through your office. You continue to be a great partner and I look forward to many more years working together.

Great information.. l just acquired a parcel of land on the coast with a beautiful ocean view. The city says it can be broken into three or maybe four lots. It has all at street , water sewer, electricity, etc. for one lot., lm to old to fool with it and needed some ideas of how to market it , pre Estate sale. Your list gives me lots of ideas, where l had none. Thank you so much….
This is fraught with problems due to human fallibility. As long as you and your neighbor(s) get along great, everything’s fine, but there are about a million ways for it to go wrong. If he get’s pissed off at you, your water goes off. If he dies and stops paying the electric (pump) bill, your water goes off. If he decides to fill his private lake and uses up all the water, your water goes off. What if it was originally his well, you move in, then a month later says the well has to be redone – are you paying for half of his expenses enough though you just got there? If you refuse, your water goes off. The possibilities go on and on… so keep it in mind.

On the surface, it seems like such a simple creature – but there can be A LOT of potential problems lurking beneath the surface of any piece of land. I wouldn't necessarily say all these issues are common, but the fact is – any one of these things could potentially be a deal killer if not addressed properly. When you take it all into consideration, it adds up to a sizable list of things that ought to be investigated as part of your due diligence process.

Your first point of contact will be your local council, They can tell you whether a precinct structure plan has been drawn up for the area, and advise of the process and timeframe of any existing masterplan. “It’s important to establish a rapport with local government,” Coutts advises. “They will be either your blocker or saviour. There’s no use having an adversarial relationship.”
LANDFLIP is doing a superb job for my clients. I am a land broker in Alabama and I have been very impressed with the response I have gotten from advertising with LANDFLIP. The format of the property display is concise and informative...just what customers are looking for. I make sure all of my clients properties are displayed on LANDFLIP. A great product from great people.
Another surprise to landowners attempting to subdivide their land is that the act of subdividing can raise any number of additional requirements and costs on your land. While your existing parcel may have been grandfathered so that it does not have to comply with some newer laws and regulations, undertaking a subdivision can trigger a new set of impacts and requirements.
ClassifiedAds is another free listing website with a similar look and feel to Craigslist. You aren't required to maintain an account here, and the ads on this site also come with a nice little inquiry form at the bottom of each listing – so it's one less step for an interested party to contact the seller for more information. The listings also allow sellers to link to third-party websites, which is a nice little extra feature you can use to send extra traffic to your selling website.

9,861 Alabama Lots 599 Alaska Lots 15,879 Arizona Lots 12,474 Arkansas Lots 17,947 California Lots 6,629 Colorado Lots 1,098 Connecticut Lots 1,059 Delaware Lots 35 District of Columbia Lots 42,342 Florida Lots 20,650 Georgia Lots 1,170 Hawaii Lots 6,845 Idaho Lots 8,857 Illinois Lots 7,403 Indiana Lots 3,585 Iowa Lots 2,069 Kansas Lots 7,648 Kentucky Lots 3,134 Louisiana Lots 6,129 Maine Lots 4,865 Maryland Lots 1,028 Massachusetts Lots 18,665 Michigan Lots 7,325 Minnesota Lots 7,407 Mississippi Lots 9,713 Missouri Lots 5,797 Montana Lots 1,442 Nebraska Lots 3,893 Nevada Lots 2,588 New Hampshire Lots 3,388 New Jersey Lots 7,359 New Mexico Lots 9,287 New York Lots 32,804 North Carolina Lots 65 North Dakota Lots 4,955 Ohio Lots 3,952 Oklahoma Lots 6,483 Oregon Lots 7,911 Pennsylvania Lots 455 Rhode Island Lots 14,443 South Carolina Lots 1,157 South Dakota Lots 23,677 Tennessee Lots 26,203 Texas Lots 3,179 Utah Lots 1,689 Vermont Lots 16,457 Virginia Lots 2,789 Washington Lots 4,319 West Virginia Lots 16,390 Wisconsin Lots 1,832 Wyoming Lots
If this process overwhelms you, consider hiring a land broker. A land broker will take a commission but they will handle all of the above for you. Hopefully they will price the property so that you make almost as much as you would have without hiring the land broker meanwhile it saves you a lot of time and hassle. I do not recommend working with a land broker who charges a flat upfront fee even if the property doesn't sell as there is no built-in incentive for them to sell the property. Keep on top of them and make sure they are doing their job. Unless the commission is hefty, a land broker isn't going to care as much about selling your land and may end up just listing it on their own website and letting it sit there forever. Communicate regularly with your land broker so your listing remains a priority for them even if it's just to get you off their back!
I read your email and on your website almost everyday. New at this . Bought few lot in PA . Sold some @ EBay. Most challenging part is to sell land fast @ reasonable price . Your “50 Creative Ideas To Sell Your Property FAST ” really opened up new frontier for me . Tried few of them daily basis. Hope to try all of them soon. Is there any one works for you better than other ? Thanks for all help and ideas. Hope to join your mentoring program once I sell few more lot / land .
Usage restrictions aren't necessarily a bad thing – they almost always make sense on some level. They're designed to help maintain order and support the value of each property in the subdivision. On the same coin… if you aren't aware of these restrictions before you purchase, they can also create some conflict with the plans you had in mind for the property. This isn't common for most land investors (because most people have no intention of using their property for purposes that don't jive with their surroundings), but even so – you should always make sure you understand what the rules are BEFORE you buy a parcel of vacant land. This will help you avoid owning a property that requires maintenance you don't want to do, or that can't be used for your intended purpose.
In the right location, today’s seller’s market makes it so you could put your home on the market as-is and likely still receive interest. But if there’s a possibility you’re misdiagnosing your home as a desirable purchase for a teardown, you should think about preparing the home properly for the market, as minor updates and cleaning can go a long way. You could have your property appraised to see how it would likely fare compared to similar homes in your neighborhood, or consult a real estate agent to see if they expect more builder versus homebuyer interest.

Honestly, since you’re the buyer, there’s no real reason not to use a realtor (because they’ll take their money from the seller, not you). I’d just be sure to get one who knows their stuff (i.e. – make sure they have some level of experience dealing with vacant land, as it’s a whole different animal than what most realtors are used to dealing with).
This has got to be one of best articles out there about land investment. Thank you so much for the advises. I live in San Jose, CA and I am also looking into buying land myself to build a residential home on. I’m somewhat skeptical about it as i’m very new to this whole process and afraid i might be stuck on a parcel that is not build-able or would cost too much to develop. The parcel i’m looking at is currently zoned “commercial”, however, the surrounding area is heavily residential so i wonder if this was a city’s mistake. To avoid troubles down the road, I plan to hire a professional for all the permitting and developing advises/estimate (if you know anyone in the Bay Area that provides this type of service, could you please refer?) but I just don’t know how much i can completely close my eyes and just sign wherever i was told by the professional. Any advise will be much appreciated.
I’m learning the hard way about the hidden costs of buying empty land. Unless utilities are already there, it can be VERY expensive to run them from the street to the building site. For example, one parcel we looked at was about 1000′ feet off the main road where utilities are located. To run city water, gas, electricity, and cable could run anywhere from $10-100 per foot! Multiply that by 1000 and I better understand why developers say that they spend the same on running utilities as they do on the land. It may cause us to reevaluate our goals and possibly shift to buying a property that already has a rundown home on it.
I just purchased 5 acres in a rural setting for half the assessed value (the assessment seems a bit high) as an investment. The advice I’ve received to increase the value is have it surveyed, sub-divided into 2 lots, and get a perk test done for both lots. Does this make sense to you? What about others ways to increase the value, such as putting in a gravel drive, running electric, or wells? It has good road frontage, and utilities are at least at the corner of the property.
Writing a legally enforceable contract for sale with your buyer means spelling out any contingencies like the buyer obtaining financing if needed and doing due diligence to ensure the property suits intended needs. Look online to review real estate land contracts for your state to ensure that you don't overlook crucial factors. Processing the sale through an escrow at a title company will ensure that there are no liens or other claims to the deed that could cause problems down the road. Title companies also make sure that all legal details are in order, all documents are properly prepared and signed and the deed is officially recorded.
LANDFLIP is part of the LANDFLIP family of sites, the only land marketplace created and managed by former land brokers and made available to sellers of all types, including land brokers, land agents, land auctioneers, and land for sale by owner. A trusted brand used by industry leaders since 2004, we offer affordable listing plans, and your qualifying properties will be listed throughout our family of sites: LANDFLIP, FARMFLIP, RANCHFLIP, LOTFLIP, AUCTIONFLIP, and COMMERCIALFLIP.

I suggest you go to your local real estate clubs and get more buyers there! You know, its like if you wanted to find a job really quick. You can go to several head hunters, several temp to hire agency, and you can put all these people to work for you - for not a dime of your money. Thats what I call people leveraging. When your at home, you are going to have several people calling you back to tell you about offers they have for you and you can then cherry pick the offers and take the one that best fits you. Real estate clubs are full of people who want to find you buyers - these people are called wholesalers. And guess what, you can have as many as you need. I say, work smart not hard!
All four of these elements impact the value of your land dramatically.  We speak with hundreds of land owners each month who did not take some of these elements into consideration when they purchased and they have difficulty coming to grasp with the reality of the value of their land.  Each situation is very unique and the marketplace is not very forgiving at the moment.  Read the rest of this entry
Ideally, you should employ a realtor and real estate attorney that know what restrictive covenants there are and what you can and can’t build on that piece of property, says Veissi. "But you still may need to do some grunt work. Find out how the property is zoned." Zoning ordinances and regulations are laws that define how you can use the property. Depending on your needs, will you have to change the zoning? For instance, if the property is zoned for an industrial warehouse or office building and you want to build a retail outlet. Also, zoning ordinances will typically limit the total height of a building or require a certain number of parking spaces for a commercial building. Opposition to zoning changes by local residents or other invested parties can be fierce—time consuming and costly.
Usage restrictions aren't necessarily a bad thing – they almost always make sense on some level. They're designed to help maintain order and support the value of each property in the subdivision. On the same coin… if you aren't aware of these restrictions before you purchase, they can also create some conflict with the plans you had in mind for the property. This isn't common for most land investors (because most people have no intention of using their property for purposes that don't jive with their surroundings), but even so – you should always make sure you understand what the rules are BEFORE you buy a parcel of vacant land. This will help you avoid owning a property that requires maintenance you don't want to do, or that can't be used for your intended purpose.
While often unpopular with locals, people who wish to cash in on their gardens get a lot of help from planning laws. According to Craig Noel of Strutt & Parker, it is becoming very difficult for planning authorities to resist applications to build houses in back gardens, thanks to one of the new planning guidelines, PPG3, which obliges houses to be built at higher densities in future.
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Usage restrictions aren't necessarily a bad thing – they almost always make sense on some level. They're designed to help maintain order and support the value of each property in the subdivision. On the same coin… if you aren't aware of these restrictions before you purchase, they can also create some conflict with the plans you had in mind for the property. This isn't common for most land investors (because most people have no intention of using their property for purposes that don't jive with their surroundings), but even so – you should always make sure you understand what the rules are BEFORE you buy a parcel of vacant land. This will help you avoid owning a property that requires maintenance you don't want to do, or that can't be used for your intended purpose.
If you have plenty of time and are not in a hurry to sell the property, and would like to do very little work I would suggest listing it with a broker. They will be able to create a listing for the property, answer phone call and emails, and handle the closing. The downside of this approach is comes at a price and you typically only get local exposure and most real estate agents who deal with both land and homes will most likely put more effort into selling their homes as the commissions are greater.
You also need to confirm that each of your planned lots will be properly serviced. Most homeowners expect to face a public road (with adequate frontage) and have water, sewer, power and other utilities available. So be sure to confirm both that typical utilities are available for your lots and that they will have the capacity to handle the load from any new homes that would be built on the subdivided lots. Do your research and have your surveyor locate water, sewer, gas, electricity and other utility lines and infrastructure on your plan.
On those notes, pay attention to who you’re likely buyer will be, and seek out those people. If the land is zoned for commercial businesses, make entrepreneurs and existing business owners your target audience. A real estate agent who is selling a flat property that gets a lot of sunshine may want to reach out to energy companies who are looking to build solar arrays.
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